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purenetwork

Name

purenetwork, purenetwork-create, purenetwork-delete, purenetwork-disable, purenetwork-enable, purenetwork-list, purenetwork-setattr — manages the network interfaces used to connect a FlashArray system to a network

purenetwork-ping, purenetwork-trace — pings remote destinations and traces routes on the network

Synopsis

purenetwork create vif [--address ADDRESS] --subnet SUBNET INTERFACE

purenetwork delete INTERFACE...

purenetwork disable INTERFACE

purenetwork enable INTERFACE

purenetwork list [ --cli | --csv | --nvp ] [--notitle] [--page] [--raw] [--service SERVICE] [--subnet SUBNET] --vlan VLAN

purenetwork ping [--count COUNT] [--interface INTERFACE] [--no-hostname] [--packet-size PACKET-SIZE] [--user-to-user-latency] DEST

purenetwork setattr [--address ADDRESS] [--gateway GATEWAY] [--mtu MTU-SIZE] [--netmask NETMASK] [ --slavelist SLAVELIST | --addslavelist SLAVELIST | --remslavelist SLAVELIST ] [--subnet SUBNET] INTERFACE

purenetwork trace [--dont-fragment] [--interface] [--method METHOD] [--mtu] [--no-hostname] [--port PORT] [--source SOURCE] DEST

Arguments

DEST

Internet Protocol (IP) address or full hostname of a ping target or of a remote computer to which the network route is to be determined.

INTERFACE

Network interface name.

Ethernet interface names are in the form CTx.ETHy, where x denotes the controller (0 or 1) and y denotes the interface (0 or 1).

App interface names are in the form APP.datay and APP.mgmty, where APP denotes the app name and y denotes the interface (0 or 1).

Bond interface names are comprised of alphanumeric characters.

VLAN interface names include a VLAN ID number, which is appended to the name of the physical interface.

In CLI commands, interface names are case-insensitive. For example, CT0.ETH0, Ct0.Eth0, CT0.eth0, and ct0.eth0 refer to the same Ethernet interface name. Likewise, bond1, Bond1, and BOND1 refer to the same bond interface name.

Options

-h | --help

Can be used with any command or subcommand to display a brief syntax description.

--address ADDRESS

IP address to be associated with the specified Ethernet interface.

For IPv4, enter the address in CIDR notation ddd.ddd.ddd.ddd/dd. For example, 10.20.20.210/24. Alternatively, specify the address ddd.ddd.ddd.ddd with a netmask (--netmask).

For IPv6, enter the address and prefix length in the form xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx/xxx. For example, 2001:0db8:85a3::ae26:8a2e:0370:7334/64. Consecutive fields of zeros can be shortened by replacing the zeros with a double colon (::). Alternatively, specify the address xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx with a prefix length (--netmask).

--addslavelist (Bond interfaces only)

Comma-separated list of one or more additional slave devices to be added to the specified bond interface. The slave device name should only include the interface name ethX. Do not include the controller name ct0.

Purity disables the interface before it is added as a slave device to a bond interface. If the slave device that you are adding to the bond interface is an administrative interface, it will lose SSH connection and no longer be able to connect to the controller.

--count COUNT

Number of Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) ping messages to send in sequence.

--dont-fragment

Do not fragment the probe packets. For IPv4 and IPv6, it also sets the Don't Fragment (DF) bit. By default, IP allows the packets to be fragmented when it goes through a segment with a smaller maximum transmission unit (MTU).

--gateway GATEWAY

IP address of the gateway through which the specified interface is to communicate with the network. For IPv4, specify the gateway IP address in the form ddd.ddd.ddd.ddd. For IPv6, specify the gateway IP address in the form xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx. When specifying an IPv6 address, consecutive fields of zeros can be shortened by replacing the zeros with a double colon (::).

To remove the gateway specification, set to a null value ("").

--interface INTERFACE

For purenetwork ping, IP address or interface name of the current controller. If the interface is an address, the source address is set to the specified interface address.

For purenetwork trace, interface name of the current controller.

--method METHOD

Method for trace operations. By default, the trace operation uses the UDP method. Trace operations can also be specified as ICMP (icmp) or TCP (tcp).

--mtu (purenetwork trace only)

Maximum transmission unit (MTU) along the path being traced between two Ethernet hosts.

--mtu MTU-SIZE (purenetwork setattr only)

Maximum message transfer unit (packet) size for the interface in bytes. Valid values are integers between 1280 and 9216 (inclusive). Defaults to 1500 if not specified.

--netmask NETMASK

Defines the range of IP addresses that make up a group of IP addresses on the same network. For IPv4, if the address is not entered in CIDR notation, enter the subnet mask in the form ddd.ddd.ddd.ddd. For example, 255.255.255.0. For IPv6, if the address entered did not include a prefix length, specify the prefix length. For example, 64.

--no-hostname

Do not map IP addresses to hostnames when displaying them.

--packet-size PACKET-SIZE

The number of data bytes to be sent. The default packet size is 56. For ICMP tracing, the default packet size is combined with 8 bytes of ICMP header data to equal 64 ICMP data bytes.

--port PORT

Initial destination port. The default destination port is 33434.

For UDP tracing, specifies the destination port base used by purenetwork trace. The destination port number will be incremented by each probe. For ICMP tracing, specifies the initial ICMP sequence value incremented by each probe. For TCP tracing, specifies the destination port to connect.

--remslavelist (Bond interfaces only)

Comma-separated list of one or more slave devices to be removed from the specified bond interface.

--service

Lists only the interfaces configured with the specified service. Supported services include (case-sensitive) app, iscsi, management, and replication.

--slavelist (Bond interfaces only)

Comma-separated list of one or more slave devices to be added to the specified bond interface. In the purenetwork setattr command, this option replaces the entire list of slave devices that are currently associated with the specified bonding interface.

The slave device name should only include the interface name ethX. Do not include the controller name ct0.

Purity disables the interface before it is added as a slave device to a bond interface. If the slave device that you are adding to the bond interface is an administrative interface, it will lose SSH connection and no longer be able to connect to the controller.

--source SOURCE

Alternative source address. The source address must be the address of one of the interfaces. By default, purenetwork trace uses the address of the outgoing interface.

--subnet SUBNET

For purenetwork setattr, name of the subnet which the physical, virtual, bond, or VLAN interface is to be attached. To detach a physical, virtual, or bond interface from a subnet, set to an empty string ("").

For purenetwork list, lists only the interfaces that belong to the specified subnet.

--user-to-user-latency

Prints full user-to-user latency. By default, purenetwork ping prints network round-trip times.

--vlan

Lists only the interfaces configured with the specified VLAN ID.

Options that control display format:

--cli

Displays output in the form of CLI commands that can be issued to reproduce the current configuration. The --cli output is not meaningful when combined with immutable attributes.

--csv

Lists information in comma-separated value (CSV) format. The --csv output can be used for scripting purposes and imported into spreadsheet programs.

--notitle

Lists information without column titles.

--nvp

Lists information in name-value pair (NVP) format, in the form ITEMNAME=VALUE. Argument names and information items are displayed flush left. The --nvp output is designed both for convenient viewing of what might otherwise be wide listings, and for parsing individual items for scripting purposes.

--page

Turns on interactive paging.

--raw

Displays the unformatted version of column titles and data. For example, in the purearray monitor output, the unformatted version of column title us/op (read) is usec_per_read_op. The --raw output is used to sort and filter list results.

Description

Manages the interfaces and the network connection attributes of the array.

Each FlashArray controller is equipped with two 1-gigabit Ethernet (1GbE) interfaces that connect to a data center network for array administration. The interfaces are called CTx.ETH0 and CTx.ETH1, where x denotes the array controller number. Physical interface ports are located on controller rear bulkheads, and are labeled ETH1 (left) and ETH0 (right).

The purenetwork enable and purenetwork disable subcommands respectively enable and disable a network interface.

Take caution when disabling an interface. If you disable an interface through which an administrative session is being conducted, it will lose SSH connection and no longer be able to connect to the controller.

The purenetwork list subcommand lists all the network interfaces for all controllers on the array.

App interfaces only appear for the apps that have been installed. For bond interfaces, the list also includes the bond interface slave devices, if any. For interfaces that belong to subnets, the list also includes the name of the subnet to which they belong. Include the --service or --vlan option to display only the interfaces that are configured with the specified service type or VLAN ID, respectively.

The purenetwork setattr subcommand changes the IP address, netmask, gateway, and MTU attributes of the specified physical, virtual, or bond interface. If the interface belongs to a subnet, you can only change the IP address.

The prefix length can either be specified with the --address option, or as a netmask (for IPv4) or prefix length (for IPv6) with the --netmask option.

In the following example, an IPv4 address is being associated with interface ct0.eth1 (both commands are equivalent):

purenetwork setattr --address 192.168.0.25/24 ct0.eth1
purenetwork setattr --address 192.168.0.25 --netmask 255.255.255.0 ct0.eth1
      

In the following example, an IPv6 address is being associated with interface ct0.eth1 (both commands are equivalent):

purenetwork setattr --address 2001:0db8:85a3::ae26:8a2e:0370:7334/64 ct0.eth1
purenetwork setattr --address 2001:0db8:85a3::ae26:8a2e:0370:7334 --netmask 64 ct0.eth1
      

Network interface IP addresses and netmasks are set explicitly (DHCP is not supported), along with the corresponding netmasks.

Gateways are specified by IP address. To remove a port's gateway specification, set the --gateway option to a null value (""). In the following example, a null value is specified to remove the port's gateway specification that was associated with ct0.eth0:

purenetwork setattr --gateway "" ct0.eth1
      

Change the maximum transmission unit (MTU) of an interface by specifying --mtu. If you are changing the MTU of a physical interface that is associated with a VLAN, verify the MTU of the physical interface is greater than or equal to (>=) the MTU of the VLAN interface.

Apps

The Apps platform extends array functionality by integrating add-on, VM-based services into the Purity operating system. Each app within the platform provides one or more services.

For each app that is installed by Pure Storage Support, one app management interface is created per array management interface. An app data interface may also be created for high-speed data transfers.

The naming convention for app interfaces is APP.datay for the app data interface, and APP.mgmty for the app management interface, where APP denotes the app name, and y denotes the interface.

The following example lists three app interfaces for the linux app. The linux.mgmt0 interface has been enabled and configured with an IP address to give pureuser the ability to log into the app.

$ purenetwork list
Name         Enabled  Address     ...  Speed       Services
...
linux.data0  False    -           ...  10.00 Gb/s  app
linux.mgmt0  True    10.8.102.96  ...  1.00 Gb/s   app
linux.mgmt1  False    -           ...  1.00 Gb/s   app
...

For more information about Apps, refer to pureapp(1).

Network Bonding

A bond interface combines two or more similar Ethernet interfaces, such as two or more 1GbE or two or more 10GbE interfaces, to form a single virtual "bonded" interface. A bond interface provides higher data transfer rates, load balancing, and link redundancy.

The purenetwork setattr --addslavelist option adds Ethernet interfaces to a bond interface.

When you add an Ethernet interface to a bond interface, it becomes a slave to the bond interface. An Ethernet interface can only belong to one bond interface at a time. Administrative slaves cannot be added as slaves to bond interfaces. Furthermore, bond interfaces cannot be slaves to other bond interfaces.

Subnets

Interfaces with common attributes can be organized into subnetworks, or subnets, to enhance the efficiency of app, data (iSCSI), management, and replication traffic.

In Purity, subnets can include physical, virtual, bond, and VLAN interfaces.

Physical, virtual, and bond interfaces can belong to the same subnet. To configure a subnet with physical, virtual, or bond interfaces:

  1. Create the subnet. Run puresubnet create to create the subnet.

  2. Add the physical, virtual, and bond interfaces to the subnet. Run purenetwork setattr --subnet to add a physical, virtual, or bond interface to a subnet.

To remove a physical, virtual, or bond interface from a subnet, set the --subnet option to a null value.

VLAN interfaces can belong to subnets, but they cannot be mixed with other interface types. All of the VLAN interfaces within a subnet must be in the same VLAN.

To configure a subnet with VLAN interfaces:

  1. Create a subnet, assigning a VLAN ID to the subnet. Run puresubnet create --vlan to create the subnet.

  2. Run purenetwork create vif --subnet to create a VLAN interface. The VLAN ID of the VLAN interface must match the VLAN ID of the subnet. Run the command for each corresponding physical network interface to be associated with the VLAN. To remove a VLAN interface from a subnet, run purenetwork delete.

For more information about subnets, refer to puresubnet(1).

Subnets and VLAN Interfaces

VLAN tagging allows customers to isolate traffic through multiple virtual local area networks (VLANs), ensuring data routes to and from the appropriate networks.

The purenetwork create vif command creates VLAN interfaces.

Create a VLAN interface for each of the corresponding physical network interfaces you want to associate with a VLAN.

In Purity, VLAN interfaces have the naming structure ctx.ETHy.z, where x denotes the controller (0 or 1), y denotes the interface (0 or 1), and z denotes the VLAN ID number. For example, ct0.eth1.500.

The purenetwork create vif command requires the --subnet option, which adds the new VLAN interface to the appropriate subnet. Run puresubnet list to display a list of all subnets on the array. Run puresubnet create to create a new subnet.

All interfaces, including VLAN interfaces, inherit the MTU value of its subnet. Note that the MTU of a VLAN interface cannot exceed the MTU of the corresponding physical interface.

VLAN is only supported for the iSCSI service type, so before creating a VLAN interface, verify the iSCSI service is configured on the physical interface.

When creating a VLAN interface, include the --address option to create a reachable VLAN interface.

After a VLAN interface has been created and attached to a subnet, the interface inherits the mask, gateway, MTU, and VLAN ID from the subnet. Likewise, the subnet inherits the service type (for example, iSCSI) from its interfaces.

For more information about subnets and VLAN tagging, refer to puresubnet(1).

Network Ping and Trace

The purenetwork ping subcommand is used to determine whether a remote computer can be accessed by the array, provided that the remote computer is ICMP-enabled. The ping target can be specified by IP address. If a DNS service is available and has been configured for the array, the ping target can be specified by hostname.

The purenetwork trace subcommand traces and displays the route to a remote computer identified by IP address or, if a DNS service is available and configured for the array, by hostname.

Examples

Example 1

purenetwork enable ct0.eth1
      

Enables controller ct0's administrative network interface eth1 to communicate with the administrative network.

Example 2

purenetwork list
      

Lists the attributes of the all network interfaces on the array.

Example 3

purenetwork setattr ct0.eth1 --address 192.168.0.24 --netmask 255.255.255.0
purenetwork setattr ct0.eth1 --address 192.168.0.24/24
      

Assigns IPv4 address 192.168.0.24 to administrative Ethernet interface ct0.eth1. Both commands are equivalent.

Example 4

purenetwork setattr --addslavelist eth2,eth3 bond009
      

Adds Ethernet interfaces eth2 and eth3 as slaves to bond interface bond009.

Example 5

purenetwork setattr --address 10.8.108.165 linux.mgmt0
purenetwork enable linux.mgmt0
      

Assigns IP address 10.8.108.165 to app management interface linux.mgmt0 and enables the interface, giving pureuser the ability to log into the linux app.

Example 6

purenetwork create vif --address 192.168.0.24 --subnet ESXHost001 ct0.eth5.500
      

Creates VLAN interface ct0.eth5.500 with IP address 192.168.0.24, and adds it to existing subnet ESXHost001. The new VLAN interface inherits the mask, gateway, MTU, and VLAN ID from subnet ESXHost001.

Example 7

purenetwork delete ct0.eth5.500
      

Removes VLAN interface ct0.eth5.500 from its subnet and then deletes it.

Example 8

 purenetwork setattr --subnet "" ct0.eth5
      

Removes physical interface ct0.eth5 from its subnet. The interface is not deleted.

Example 9

 purenetwork ping --count 100 myhost.mydomain.com
      

Sends 100 ICMP ping messages to host myhost.mydomain.com and displays the response received for each one.

Example 10

purenetwork trace 192.168.0.1
      

Displays the route taken by a ping request to network address 192.168.0.1.

Author

Pure Storage Inc.